Adam Leitman Bailey Gives Historical Tour to High School Students.

Adam Leitman Bailey Gives Historical Tour to High School Students. The Tour Includes Visits to Federal Hall, the Site of George Washington’s First Inauguration, the Location of the Passing of the Bill of Rights, Ground Zero and the Federal Reserve.

NMHS Goes Up in Stock

By Diane Montecuollo & Nick Borner

Despite the failing economy, NMHS still holds stock in the stock market. Courtesy Adam Leitman Bailey, Joseph Tusa’s AP History class had the unique opportunity to tour through Wall street.

Those who went to last year’s graduation ceremony may recall that Bailey was the honored speaker. Bailey is an alumnus of New Milford High School class of 1988, who after completing his education at Rutgers University and Syracuse University College of Law, went on to be recognized as one of the top ten real estate lawyers in New York Metro Area by Super Lawyers Magazine. Mr. Bailey recently began to generously give back to NMHS. At last year’s senior awards dinner he donated a $10,000 scholarship in the name of Ray Harrison, former English teacher and G&T teacher, to a NMHS graduate who will be attending Rutgers University in 2008-2009. Last years recipient was Meryl Jacobs.

On October 22nd, upon arriving in the city the AP history students assembled at the lobby of Adam Leitman Bailey‘s office. Bailey gave students a tour of many historic and significant buildings. At Federal Hall, students learned that the building was the location of the first capital of the United States, the site of George Washington’s first inauguration in 1789 and the location of passing of the Bill of Rights. Here, they also learned about the relevance and importance of the trail of John Peter Zenger in 1785 which granted us our freedom of the press.

Another site visited was Trinity Church. For one AP History student, Alex Pak, Trinity Church was his favorite location because he learned that Alexandra Hamilton was buried there. Eve Mendelson felt that Hamilton’s grave was a “beautiful structure,” where she, “felt the presence of a great economic mind.”

One signification attraction on the tour was Ground Zero. Bailey recalled the events of that tragic day, September 11th. Along with hundreds of other people, Bailey remember running toward the Hudson River and out of the harms way. Sheryl Mathew recalls the experience of visiting the site, “It was really emotion to see a place where so many people have died.”

Many students enjoyed visiting the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, the most important bank in New York City, and the most important federal reserve bank in the nation. Ian Campanelli liked this stop on the tour, she jokingly said, “That’s where they keep the money!” It was at this site that Bailey cleared up any concerning the financial crisis and $700 billion bailout occurring in our country today, in a way which 16-year-olds could understand.

Overall, students felt the experience gave them a better understanding of Wall street and how the economy works. Students were grateful to Bailey. Mendelson states, “Everyone seemed to have a great time and Mr. Bailey was very generous to provide us with lunch.”